Posted 2 years ago
smarterplanet:

Knocking Down Apple’s Walled Garden: HTML5 vs. iOS Apps | ReadWriteWeb
Today Amazon launched an HTML5 browser version of its market leading eReader application, Kindle. Called Kindle Cloud Reader, it’s a direct response to the 30% cut of sales that Apple now takes from in-app purchases and subscriptions via iOS  apps. The 30% Apple toll hits businesses like Amazon hard, because the  margins on book sales are slim enough as it is.
The HTML5 Kindle site appears to be optimized for the iPad. It’s  accessed from the Safari browser in the iPad, so it routes around  Apple’s App Store. That means Amazon doesn’t need to give Apple 30% of  an eBook sale. Because the HTML5 site is very close to the functionality  of the iPad Kindle app, this is going to have huge ramifications for  Apple. Yes, Apple’s walled garden has just been structurally weakened. I’d go as far as to say that it’s a matter of months, not years, before Amazon pulls its iOS Kindle app from the App Store.

smarterplanet:

Knocking Down Apple’s Walled Garden: HTML5 vs. iOS Apps | ReadWriteWeb

Today Amazon launched an HTML5 browser version of its market leading eReader application, Kindle. Called Kindle Cloud Reader, it’s a direct response to the 30% cut of sales that Apple now takes from in-app purchases and subscriptions via iOS apps. The 30% Apple toll hits businesses like Amazon hard, because the margins on book sales are slim enough as it is.

The HTML5 Kindle site appears to be optimized for the iPad. It’s accessed from the Safari browser in the iPad, so it routes around Apple’s App Store. That means Amazon doesn’t need to give Apple 30% of an eBook sale. Because the HTML5 site is very close to the functionality of the iPad Kindle app, this is going to have huge ramifications for Apple. Yes, Apple’s walled garden has just been structurally weakened. I’d go as far as to say that it’s a matter of months, not years, before Amazon pulls its iOS Kindle app from the App Store.

Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
pitchfork:

Coldplay’s new album, Mylo Xyloto, is out October 24 via Capitol. We don’t know what Mylo Xyloto means, either.

pitchfork:

Coldplay’s new album, Mylo Xyloto, is out October 24 via Capitol. We don’t know what Mylo Xyloto means, either.

Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
Posted 2 years ago
smarterplanet:

Sifteo launches intelligent blocks as a new form of entertainment | VentureBeat
Sifteo, a table-top game  startup, is announcing today that it has begun selling intelligent  blocks known as Sifteo Cubes. These devices are like little dominoes  with displays on one side.
The cubes are wireless, motion-aware 1.5-inch blocks with full-color  screens that create unique interactions when moved, tilted, rotated and  placed next to one another. Merrill referred to this as “intelligent  play,” inspired by games such as dominoes, Tetris, and Sudoku. The  devices are really embedded computers, armed with ARM Cortex M3  processors. Merrill said Sifteo created its own wireless protocol so the  blocks could talk to each other within a range of a few inches, without  consuming too much power. The blocks can connect to a USB stick on a  computer within about a 20-feet range. The batteries last about four  hours.
The Sifteo Cubes are a clever creation, but will consumers pay for  them? You pay $149 for three Sifteo Cubes and $45 for each additional  one. Downloadable games cost around $5. If the idea takes off, Sifteo  will succeed in creating a new form of entertainment that combines video  games, physical board games, building blocks and toys. It may be a  tough sell, but there’s no doubt that the company has something very  creative on its hands.

smarterplanet:

Sifteo launches intelligent blocks as a new form of entertainment | VentureBeat

Sifteo, a table-top game startup, is announcing today that it has begun selling intelligent blocks known as Sifteo Cubes. These devices are like little dominoes with displays on one side.

The cubes are wireless, motion-aware 1.5-inch blocks with full-color screens that create unique interactions when moved, tilted, rotated and placed next to one another. Merrill referred to this as “intelligent play,” inspired by games such as dominoes, Tetris, and Sudoku. The devices are really embedded computers, armed with ARM Cortex M3 processors. Merrill said Sifteo created its own wireless protocol so the blocks could talk to each other within a range of a few inches, without consuming too much power. The blocks can connect to a USB stick on a computer within about a 20-feet range. The batteries last about four hours.

The Sifteo Cubes are a clever creation, but will consumers pay for them? You pay $149 for three Sifteo Cubes and $45 for each additional one. Downloadable games cost around $5. If the idea takes off, Sifteo will succeed in creating a new form of entertainment that combines video games, physical board games, building blocks and toys. It may be a tough sell, but there’s no doubt that the company has something very creative on its hands.

Posted 2 years ago

kateoplis:

You guys, I just came nose-to-nose with this thing and almost fell face-down. Good time to be a klutz, Kate.